Dating viloence

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If your child grows up seeing what healthy relationships look like, he or she may be less likely to abuse a dating partner, or to stay in an abusive relationship.

Although many people assume that they will never have to face being in an abusive relationship, one in three teen relationships involves violence.

One in four adolescents reports physical, sexual, emotional, or verbal abuse by a dating partner each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The CDC also estimates that about 10 percent of students in the United States report being physically hurt by a boyfriend or girlfriend in the past 12 months.

There are specific warning signs that may indicate your teen is in an abusive relationship.

Of those teen survivors, 3% of teens in abusive relationships reported the abuse to authority figures and 6% told family members. Studies show that teens experiencing abuse are more likely to smoke or use drugs, take diet pills/laxatives, engage in risky sexual behaviors, and attempt or consider suicide. Teens experiencing abuse are usually silent about their experience; often, teens blame themselves or normalize abusive behaviors as typical.Even behaviors that seem small can lead to more serious violence, like physical assault and rape.Abusers often use physical violence, threats, emotional abuse, harassment, or stalking to control their boyfriend's or girlfriend's behavior. When you interact with a romantic partner, friend, or your child, make sure to show respect and appreciation for that person.It is a way of controlling another person, and even abuse that doesn't leave physical marks can have profound emotional consequences and put the person being abused in danger. Written By: Anna Rafferty, college student writer Reviewed By: Nancy Brown, Ph. Last Reviewed: October 2013Sources: Below are links PAMF accessed when researching this topic.

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